Flat Panel Security Summary

Walter G. Aiello Walter.Aiello at Duke.edu
Thu Jan 16 21:01:12 GMT 2003


Greetings:

There was a small number of responses to my inquiry on
physical security for flat panel displays, with several
people asking for a summary. Rather than wait for more
responses here goes:

One person reported their experience with Anchorpad,
which is a, "decent cable and adhesive pad method, once
hardened to the device it can not be removed without
breaking the plastic it is attached to." However it was
also found that somebody armed with a butane torch and
boltcutters could melt the loop on the adhesive pad and
cut the cable. The Adhesivepad loop could also be melted
by heating a paperclip with a lighter and pulling it
through the loop.
   http://www2.thomasregister.com/olc/anchorpadintl

Others used in house solutions, and home made cables
running through the Kensington security slots that come
with most flat panel displays.

Yet another built cages secured from under the table for
the computers. For the flat panel displays they use either
security cables attached either with special screws that
replace existing screws in the back of the flat panel, or
by cables attached with glue-on connectors. The company
that supplies these also touts a sonic shock alarm which
makes an obnoxious noise for about two hours after the
cable is cut and a PC Tab which is supposed to protect
against theft of the system and also protects against RAM
chip theft.
   http://www.secure-it.com

Our displays are in a fairly protected area open only to
a limited number of doctors. So we really need something
that would keep a basically honest person honest. Further,
the doctors generally like to reposition the monitors to
some degree, so an adhesive pad would not be an option.
It would appear that suitably attached cables, possibly
with other devices such as the sonic alarm or the PC Tab
alarm system would satisfy our needs.

-- 
Walter G. Aiello, Ph.D.
Manager, Network and Information Services
Magnetic Resonance Research Section
Box 3808, Department of Radiology
Duke University Medical Center

Walter.Aiello at Duke.edu
(919) 684 7519

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