BTW in my exhausting coverage of the storm worm :-)&nbsp; I should mention<br>this article:<br><a href="http://www.securityfocus.com/news/11473">http://www.securityfocus.com/news/11473</a><br>This explains a few things, I guess. I&#39;m not well-versed in DNS I&#39;m afraid. 
<br><br>I take it they are not talking about the urls in the storm messages themselves?<br>Because those are are IP numbers not domain names&nbsp; in most of the ones I got. I<br><br>Two I just got: <br><br>Address:&nbsp; 24.93. 201.2
<br>Name:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <a href="http://cpe-24-93-201-2.neo.res.rr.com">cpe-24-93-201-2.neo.res.rr.com</a><br><br>Address:&nbsp; 65.190. 29.151<br>
Name:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <a href="http://cpe-065-190-029-151.triad.res.rr.com">cpe-065-190-029-151.triad.res.rr.com</a><br><br>I&#39;d love to hear more about this dnsflux business. A comment to that article asked?<br>&quot;Why don&#39;t ISPs just block the inbound DNS traffic to home machines on
dynamic addresses? Do that and the distributed DNS part evaporates.&quot;<br><br>Is that true? <br><br>example messages:<br>****<br>Hi. School-mate has sent you a postcard.
<br>See your card as often as you wish during the next 15 days.
<br>
<br>SEEING YOUR CARD
<br>
<br>If your email software creates links to Web pages, click on your 
card&#39;s direct www address below while you are connected to the Internet:
<br>
<br><a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://24.93.201.2/?4b9999b98562bd22ca398b69146019a182349">http://24.93.do not click 201.2/?4b9999b98562bd22stay away ca398b69146019a182349</a>
<br>
<br>Or copy and paste it into your browser&#39;s &quot;Location&quot; box (where Internet 
addresses go).
<br>
<br>We hope you enjoy your awesome card.
<br>
<br>Wishing you the best,
<br>Administrator,
<br>Greeting-Cards.Com
<br>
<br>